Search Within a Specific Article or Section using "Search Within These Results"

Many of you have requested the ability to search within a specific article within a Journal or within a specific section of a document. We are currently working in development to be able to offer this functionality in the future. In the meantime, here's one method or way that you can try in order to achieve this type of search. The general approach involves searching for an exact article title within a collection, narrowing your results to one and then searching within that result for a term or phrase. The approach will vary by library as each library in HeinOnline is indexed differently, thus altering the method of finding an article or section title. In some cases, this approach is not applicable due to a more high-level index, like in the Federal Register. Therefore, I'll provide examples from a few different collections to illustrate how to apply the concept.

Law Journals Library:
We know the article title is "Federalism and Environmental Regulation: A Public Choice Analysis" within the Harvard Law Review. From within this article, we are specifically looking for Robert Crandall's studies as they relate to the State Environmental Regulation before 1970. To search for Robert Crandall's studies within this article, we will construct the below query:

  1. Open the Field Search option from within the Law Journals Library.
  2. Enter Federalism and Environmental Regulation: A Public Choice Analysis into the first search box. Select phrase and then choose title from the field drop-down.
  3. Select Harv.L.Rev. from the title menu.
  4. Leave all section types checked as the default options.
  5. Click Search.
  6. This will return one result with an exact match to that article title. Now, click on the "Search Within These Results" button above your list of results. Search for 2 phrases within these results by entering the following search query into the search box: text:"state environmental regulation before 1970" AND text:"Robert Crandall". Leave all other options as they are. Click Search.
  7. Click on view matching text pages and you will see links to the pages where these terms appear. Remember, the View Matching Text Pages will only be displayed if you search in the text field. Therefore, when using this method, it is recommended to use the "text" field when you construct your search query.
Note: When using the "Search Within These Results" feature, you must construct your search using advanced search syntax. If you are unsure how to construct the search, click on "Search Tips" for some hints.

If you are researching a topic and come across an article of relevancy, you can use this method to search that article for a word, phrase, name, or other term of interest. When you are viewing the article, click on the Table of Contents tab. The title of the article you are viewing is highlighted in yellow. Copy the title name, then click on Search/Field Search. Paste or enter the title name into the first box, just as we did above in step 2. Select the title from the title menu. Then click search. Once you have the result for that title, follow steps 6-7 above.

Note: The title listing in the Table of Contents may include italicized text (i.e. Recent Cases). This text is not part of the title; rather it is a description of the article. Therefore, do not include this text in your title name when entering the search terms.


The above techniques can be applied to other libraries in HeinOnline. However, each library is indexed differently, thus it may require a bit of creativity to retrieve one result for the article or section name. Below are 2 more examples from different libraries.

English Reports Library:
From within the West v. Baxendale case, we want to find the part of the case that references "Whetstone".
  1. Open the Field Search option from within the English Reports Library.
  2. Enter West v. Baxendale into the first search box. Select phrase and then choose Case Name from the field drop-down.
  3. Leave all other options checked as is.
  4. Click Search.
  5. This will return one result with an exact match to the case name. Now, click on the "Search Within These Results" button above your list of results. Enter the following search query into the "search within" box: text:whetstone. Leave all other options as they are and click search.

U.S. Supreme Court Library:

We want to find the phrase "knock and announce" as it appears within the Hudson v. Michigan case.
  1. Open the Field Search option from within the U.S. Supreme Court Library.
  2. Enter Hudson v. Michigan into the first search box. Select phrase and then choose Case Title from the field drop-down.
  3. Leave all other options checked as is.
  4. Click search.
  5. This will return one result with an exact match to the case title. Now, click on the "Search Within These Results" button above your list of results. Enter the following search query in the "search within" box: text:"knock and announce". Leave all other options as they are and click search.

Other tips to consider when applying this concept:
  1. If you have a case name in English Reports that may appear more than once in the Case Index, try searching by the nominative citation to retrieve only the result for that title. Example: Creswell v. Jackson returns 2 cases. Therefore, enter the nominative citation for the case listing you want to search; either 4 F & F 1 or 2 F & F 24.
  2. If you can not locate a case name by using the format "Name v. Name" in one field, then try using 2 fields and entering NAME into the first field, select the AND operator, and enter the 2nd NAME into the next field. Be sure to select the same title field from the drop-down for both fields.
  3. If the title is a lengthy one and you receive no results when trying the search, try removing the last few words of the title and searching again. Or, break the title into 2 parts and construct a field search looking for 2 parts of the title within the title field (divide the title at a common word such as "the" or "a").
    • Example of a long title might be: "Environmental Revolution in the Queensland Mining Industry or Just a Changing of the Guard - An Analysis of the New Regime for the Environmental Regulation of Mining under the Environmental Protection Act". You could shorten this to simply "Environmental Revolution in the Queensland Mining Industry or Just a Changing of the Guard". Or, break it into two fields and search for "Environmental Revolution in the Queensland Mining Industry" AND "Analysis of the New Regime for the Environmental Regulation of Mining".

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